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Archive for July, 2011

It’s been scorching hot on the farm this past week. Upper 80’s Low 90’s with Humidity hovering around 80% or More. I thought now was a good time to look at the farm during autumn and winter. A quiet beautiful time of reflection and preparation for next season. Enjoy the pictures and remember, dry heat is dry heat. 100 degrees in dry heat is still 100 degrees. Ever stood next to a fire? That’s dry heat and it’s still hot. So, don’t buy into the whole “dry heat” load of bull.

   

   

   

   

   

   

   
Love these last couple of shots. Winter time is such a magical season on the farm. You’ve never really heard quiet till you’ve been outside in dead of winter. No leaves rustling, no birds chirping, no nothing. It’s so quiet, it’s almost spooky yet peaceful and serene.

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Tomato Growing Tip: Water your tomatoes regularly before the leaves appear wilted.

  • Watering tomatoes is the most important element in growing tomatoes
  • Tomatoes are 90 to 95 percent water and need about 1-inch of water per week. More for sandy soil.
  • Maintain even soil moisture.
  • Don’t let the soil completely dry out.
  • Soak the soil when watering down to 6 inches.
  • Water the base, not the leaves.
  • Never over-water, which can happen if your site has poor drainage.
  • The best control for cracking is a constant and regular water supply.

   
Cucumbers need at least eight hours of sun every day and rich soil. They are frost-sensitive and prefer warm, humid weather to produce a good crop. Cucumbers are 90 percent water, so adequate watering throughout the growing season is vital to get a juicy crop.

   
There are four types of cucumbers: slicing, pickling, space-savers and the ever-popular burpless cucumber. These are pickling cucumbers. We like them cause they’re smaller, faster growing, delicious raw and make great pickles.

   
Look out! It’s Santa Crow. I woke up to find this in the rear field. My neighbors put him there to scare away the deer. He’s over 5′ tall and I think he’s doing his job. Jake saw him this morning and was barking like crazy. Aesthetically, it’s a bit of an eye sore but we’ll keep him till we can make something better. Ho! Ho! Ho!
   

Thank You All for over 1,000 visits in a month! Keep spreading the word about our little farm blog. We greatly appreciate it!

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New Poll!

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I caught this doe in the rear field this morning. I have got to get that fence repaired in the beck. Usually deer are active at dusk and dawn but this young lady was out and about around 9:30am. Not a good sign. I also caught a jack rabbit in the front garden yesterday. I won’t use chemicals to keep them out. I use hair clippings (they hate the smell of humans) I get from the local salon and I need to build a scarecrow.

   
Broccoli                                                   Cabbage

        

Corn – Planted at about 10 days apart. You can see the difference between the middle and right pic. The right pic was rototilled once again before planting so the grass is really staying out of the way as compared to the middle pic. The sweet corn looks lush green and very healthy!

   
Cucumbers                                                 Pumpkins

   
Leaf Lettuce                                                Spinach

   
Roma Tomatoes                                        Supersonic Tomatoes

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It’s Good to be Back!

Where have I been? Great question and I’ll give you the quick answer. I was critically ill. Crazy huh? I posted that I had a fever and stomach flu well, that’s what the ER said. A day or so later I went to my GP and he admitted me to the hospital immediately. I ended up with a pretty bad case of double pneumonia. 12 days later, I’m regaining my strength back here on the farm.

Here are some pictures I just took of the farm. My theme was beauty and color. No, I’m not turning soft just yet just thought we could all use a little more beauty in our days.

  

  

  

     
Parsley

  
Pepper                                                              Tomato

  
Dill                                                                    Tomatoes

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